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How Do You Build a Boy?

Video - Derby Days - Fall Breakaway 2019

The Elementary Division breaks away from our regular schedule on the two days leading into Fall Break to engage in two days of STEAM-infused learning.

This year the boys become race car designers and raced their creations down a custom track inspired by NerdyDerby.com and built by PDS alum, Parker Joyner and his team at Crosstown Arts.


How Do You Build a Boy?

Showing is Better than Telling

Dissecting a sheep heart at four-years-old to learn about how the body works? Customization, critical and creative thinking, and experiential learning — all are essential elements of a PDS boys' education.

Want to learn more about what we teach our boys? Check out our online curriculum guide.

Want to see HOW we teach our boys? Please register for our Early Childhood Open House on November 7 at 9:00am.


How Do You Build a Boy?

Why Would a Teacher Break a Perfectly Good Pencil?

At Presbyterian Day School, we know how to teach boys, reach them, and channel their energies in positive and productive ways. And we know from research that boys and girls develop language and writing skills on different timetables, it’s just how God created us.

Research also teaches us that boys need extra time to develop fine motor skills, one of the key components of writing. If you visit one of our Early Childhood classrooms, you just might spot one of the two in-classroom teachers breaking crayons or pencils. Now, why would they break a perfectly good crayon? Check out this video:

Want to learn more about what we teach our boys? Check out our online curriculum guide.

Want to see HOW we teach our boys? Please register for our Early Childhood Open House on November 7 at 9:00am.


Strategic Parenting Blog

A Humble Hero Uses Gifts for God’s Glory

Our kids love superheroes—but we don’t outgrow our need for heroes as adults. We might not have the same heroes as our kids, but we all have people we look up to. Who are your heroes? What attributes make them stand out to you?

See if these three things don’t describe your heroes:

  • They use what they have been given in an extraordinary way for the benefit of others
  • Their efforts take courage and faith
  • They don’t seek attention or glory for themselves

We tend not to hold people in high regard who use their gifts solely for themselves or seek praise for themselves. Even fictional characters we admire—heroes like Superman or Ironman—don’t use their strength and might to score goals to improve their own life.

This month, we are teaching the boys about being a Humble Hero. A Humble Hero uses the gifts they have been given by God for others. This is what it means to give glory to God. The Bible says it this way.



More from Strategic Parenting

You Can’t Do It All. Stop Trying!

Tue, Oct 10 in Strategic Parenting Blog

A Humble Hero Uses Gifts for God’s Glory

Tue, Oct 10 in Strategic Parenting Blog

Helping Our Kids Grow in Favor with God and Man

Mon, Sep 9 in Strategic Parenting Blog

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VIRTUE OF THE MONTH
The Servant Leader

Takes Initiative for Others. A servant leader recognizes that his relationship with Christ is first and his relationship with others is second.

A servant leader:
● Does what is right when no one is looking
● Stands firm in an uncertain world
● Understands leadership is an opportunity to serve
● Serves out of love
● Treats everyone fairly
● Loves and respects people with different opinions
● Looks for needs and for ways to meet them

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Strategic Parenting Blog